Author: Peter Gray

Film Review: The Aftermath (UK/USA/Germany, 2019) accepts its predictable nature and performs more than adequately

April 11, 2019

One only needs to look at the poster art for James Kent‘s postwar-set romance The Aftermath to gage the triangle of transgression that will unfold over the course of the film’s 108 minute running time.  In fact, the surface level of the Joe Shrapnel/Anna Waterhouse-penned script practically begs you to accept the predictable turn of events, […]

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Film Review: Terry Gilliam’s passion project The Man Who Killed Don Quixote (UK/France/Spain, 2018) is surprisingly void of any heart

April 11, 2019

“And now…after 25 years in the making…and unmaking” So says the wry on-screen text preceding Terry Gilliam‘s The Man Who Killed Don Quixote, a near-three decade trek for the eccentric filmmaker whose hope of bringing his off-kilter adventure-comedy to fruition has languished in development hell since its beginnings in 1989. Once intended to be a […]

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SXSW Film Review: Well Groomed (USA, 2019) is well intentioned, oddly emotionally investing, and full of heart

March 10, 2019

As new dog grooming business owner (and one of Well Groomed‘s fascinating human subjects) Nicole Beckman states during her introduction that competitive dog grooming was always something she thought as being “just silly” before entering the competitive stakes herself, her initial thoughts are likely to be mirrored by many unversed in the ways of competitive […]

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Alliance Française French Film Festival Review: The Sisters Brothers (USA/France, 2018) is at once frustrating and fascinating

March 3, 2019

With a title like The Sisters Brothers, one would be forgiven for assuming that Jacques Audiard‘s off-centred western would be something of a comedy.  Whilst there’s moments of black humour peppered throughout Audiard’s English-language debut – which makes its inclusion in this year’s Alliance Francaise French Film Festival all the more curious – this is […]

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Film Review: Happy Death Day 2U (USA, 2019) is just as much of a surprise as the delightfully twisted original

February 13, 2019

Just as much of a surprise as the delightfully twisted original – 2017’s Happy Death Day – Happy Death Day 2U is revelatory not because it improves on its predecessor’s horror temperament, but because it completely bypasses the slasher genre trope and cements itself firmly within the grounds of science-fiction. Given how much fun writer and director […]

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Album of the Week: Ariana Grande – Thank U, Next (2019 LP)

February 13, 2019

Man, can a lot change in six months! When readying the release of last August’s Sweetener, Ariana Grande was arguably at what many would consider her peak.  The album was bathed in the then-glow of her whirlwind romance with SNL comedian Pete Davidson (he even got a song named after him), with the now-Grammy Award […]

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Film Review: The Mule (USA, 2018) is a middle-ground effort from Clint Eastwood

January 22, 2019

Given that this is Clint Eastwood‘s first starring role in six years (his last being 2012’s under-the-radar sports drama The Trouble With the Curve), one would be forgiven for expecting something far more grand and notable than what is ultimately on offer; its push into prime Oscar season releases not helping matters either. Whilst this […]

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Blu-Ray Review: Sicario: Day of the Soldado (USA, 2018) succeeds as both a sequel and a stand-alone narrative

December 30, 2018

Denis Villeneuve shone a light on issues that now seem more rife than ever in 2015’s hard-hitter Sicario. For its follow-up, sub-headed Day of the Soldado, the concerns at hand are more unnerving than before, and whilst the argument of whether or not the original film needed a sequel is still a valid talking point, […]

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Interview: Jason Momoa on the 5 year journey to Aquaman and loving his own movie

December 26, 2018

As Aquaman swims his way into cinemas today (read our review here), the King of Atlantis himself, Jason Momoa, has been travelling across the globe in the film’s lead-up to promote the latest offering from the DC roster. Returning to Queensland’s sunny Gold Coast, where the film was mostly shot, Momoa chatted with The AU […]

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Film Review: Aquaman (USA, 2018) proves utterly unapologetic in its decision to play everything as riotous

December 21, 2018

After what has felt to be an endless journey for Jason Momoa‘s portrayal of the King of Atlantis to grace the screens, Aquaman finally arrives in the hopes of both serving the character justice and steering the DC ship back on course after the underwhelming Justice League. Traditionally a blonde-haired/blue-eyed creation that was often the […]

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Film Review: The School (Australia, 2018) goes for broke in its bid to provide escapism within the Australian horror landscape

December 6, 2018

It’s rather unfortunate that Australian cinema really doesn’t have the greatest reputation. It’s not that we aren’t capable of delivering quality homegrown productions, it’s just that we so seldom do, so when something like The School comes along, you can’t help but feel both a sense of disappointment and expectation. To be fair to writer/director […]

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Film Review: Mortal Engines (NZ/USA, 2018) suffers from an ensemble cast who fail to elevate the stereotypical material above expectation

December 6, 2018

As much as Peter Jackson‘s name is plastered all over this, Mortal Engines is in fact NOT a Jackson joint. Yes, the Lord of the Rings helmer is the most likely reason this film was greenlit (he serves as both co-producer and co-writer) but long-time Jackson collaborator Christian Rivers, who served predominantly as a visual […]

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Film Review: Anna and the Apocalypse (UK, 2017) is funny, romantic, appropriately gory and deliriously catchy

November 29, 2018

When you think of zombie comedies, it’s difficult to look beyond the witty brilliance that is Edgar Wright’s Shaun of the Dead (2004).  Whilst we’ve had our share of interesting takes on the walking dead in the years since, the arrival of Anna and the Apocalypse stands as the choreographed high-kick the genre needed.  Not […]

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Interview: Jamie Lee Curtis on having no fear returning to Halloween (and the fate of Wanda)

October 27, 2018

As Australia prepares to feel the sharp blade of Michael Myers puncture once again with the release of Halloween, the film’s heroine – and original genre scream queen – Jamie Lee Curtis took to our shores to spread the love of all things Laurie Strode and this four-decade long series.  Gracefully walking the black carpet […]

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Film Review: Goosebumps 2: Haunted Halloween (USA, 2018) provides some PG scares over familiar ground

October 26, 2018

Acting as a nice alternative to the brutality of Halloween, Goosebumps 2: Haunted Halloween, whilst not overly clever or necessary viewing by any means, provides enough chaotic entertainment for the younger crowd (or those young at heart) to earn their own respective scares for the spooky season. Even though its title suggests its a sequel […]

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Film Review: Halloween (USA, 2018) truly captures the atmosphere of John Carpenter’s seminal classic

October 24, 2018

Trick: The 2018 incarnation of Halloween acts as a direct continuation of the 1978 original, essentially wiping out all seven sequels (and the two Rob Zombie-helmed revisions) that succeeded in the years since. Treat: It’s good.  Like really f***ing good! After surviving the maniacal clutches of psychotic killer Michael Myers forty years prior, Laurie Strode […]

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A Star Is Reborn: Why ‘remake’ is not a dirty word

October 19, 2018

No matter how Hollywood tries to sell it, remake will always be a word deemed blasphemous to cinephiles the world over.  Sure, they can throw out terms such as reboot or reimagining or revisioning, but regardless of the spin, they all refer to the same type of picture.  And because it’s one we have experienced […]

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Film Review: In Like Flynn (Australia, 2018) is predominantly fizzy and shamelessly cheesy

October 10, 2018

Director Russell Mulcahy, the Melbourne filmmaker whose career has seen him graduate from Elton John music videos to varied levels of cinematic quality (the 1984 wild boar in the outback horror flick Razorback, the ill-advised Kim Basinger vehicle The Real McCoy, and the Geoffrey Rush drama Swimming Upstream just a few of his efforts) is […]

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Film Review: Damien Chazelle has crafted something truly impeccable with First Man (USA, 2018)

October 9, 2018

It seems almost baffling that Neil Armstrong’s account of being the first man on the moon hasn’t been told prior to Damien Chazelle‘s First Man.  Clearly an intimidating figure but still reserved, sensitive and aloof enough to not be placed upon a pedestal as some flawless being, Chazelle’s film seeks to uncover the more human […]

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Film Review: I Am Paul Walker (USA, 2018) seeks to highlight the kind-natured generosity of a man who was more than his career

September 18, 2018

It goes without saying that Paul Walker was blessed with the type of face destined to be in front of the camera.  And as much as this dedicated documentary, I Am Paul Walker, celebrates his Californian-blessed aesthetics, it seeks more so to highlight that behind the tanned skin, sun-kissed blonde curls and baby blue eyes […]

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