Author: Natalie Salvo

My writing portfolio can be found at: https://nataliesalvo.wordpress.com/

Book Review: Bobby Duffy’s The Perils of Perception is a fascinating study into general ignorance

October 16, 2018

We are wrong about most things. That may be a bitter pill to swallow but as The Perils of Perception proves, it’s true. This non-fiction book is an intriguing study into just how ignorant our society is. It draws on 100,000 interviews from forty countries. The take home message? We should be afraid. Very afraid. […]

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Theatre Review: Margaret Fulton: Queen of the Dessert is a sweet & cheesy look at the cook’s many hats (Bondi Pavilion Theatre until 27th October)

October 15, 2018

For some people food is fuel, and then there’s Margaret Fulton. This food icon has been teaching Australians how to cook for seven decades. She’s also the subject of the rollicking musical, Margaret Fulton: Queen of the Desserts. The show had its Sydney premiere this weekend and is every bit as tasty and kitsch as […]

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Interview: Stuart Coupe on recording 200+ hours of interviews with Roadies for his book’s ultimate, AAA pass

October 11, 2018

Stuart Coupe is part of the (black t-shirt) fabric of Australia’s music industry. In a career spanning four decades, he has worked as an author, journalist, promoter, artist manager, publicist and broadcaster. Coupe has written several books about Australian music. His latest one, Roadies, features stories from the hard-working men and women who toil behind-the-scenes […]

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OzAsia Festival Review: Of Fathers & Sons (Syria, 2017) lifts the veil on religious extremists

October 9, 2018

Of Fathers & Sons should come with a warning. This is likely to induce nightmares even though it’s not strictly a horror film. It is however, a horrifying documentary that chronicles a religious zealot and his young, jihadist-in-the-making sons. The result is a visceral and eye-opening look at this largely-unknown world. Filmmaker, Talal Derki is […]

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Photo credit: Grant Leslie

Review: Sydney Philharmonia Choirs’ take on Bernstein’s Candide provides a mish-mash of all possible worlds

October 2, 2018

For years people have been perplexed by Leonard Bernstein’s Candide. Is it an operetta? A comedy? Musical theatre? A little of all of the above? Perhaps the safest description is that of “comic operetta,” where the draw-card is some dynamic and electric music. Mitchell Butel directs this latest production, which coincides with what would have […]

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Book Review: Harry Cook’s Pink Ink is a queer-positive memoir that doesn’t sugarcoat things

October 1, 2018

When actor and activist Harry Cook migrated to Australia at the age of ten homosexuality had only been recently decriminalised. A few years later he would struggle with coming-out to his parents. He says acceptance was hard, because there weren’t many queer-positive stories around at the time (in fact, homophobic propaganda was rife during the AIDs […]

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Book Review: Stuart Coupe’s Roadies hands the mic back to Australia’s road crew

September 30, 2018

There’s no question that Australia’s roadies know their way around a microphone. A concert set-up doesn’t magically appear out of nowhere. It take tireless crew members toiling away to unpack, set-up, test and re-pack the staging and equipment; and repeating this process as they travel to different towns and venues. For too long, roadies may […]

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Theatre Review: Funny Girl is a joyous romp through New York’s golden years (Paramatta’s Riverside Theatre to 6th October)

September 29, 2018

The film Funny Girl is celebrating its golden anniversary but this story feels so young and vital it could have been made yesterday. Theatre & Co. present their version of Funny Girl at Parramatta’s Riverside Theatre. It’s something often associated with Barbra Streisand because it once catapulted her to fame. These are some big shoes to […]

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Theatre Review: Beauty & The Beast delivers some entertaining, family-friendly fun (Glen Street Theatre to 29th September)

September 23, 2018

It’s a tale that is – by its own admission – one that is as ‘Old as time’. The story of Beauty & the Beast has inspired two-hit Disney films and the stage production has played all over the world. Stage Artz reprise their production to deliver an entertaining and family-friendly charity event. Stage Artz […]

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Film Review: Ladies In Black (Australia, 2018) is about Fifties shop girls and is like the entrée before the main

September 19, 2018

Ladies in Black could have been named “Shopgirl”, but that title was already taken. The film, set over the summer of 1959 in a Department store like David Jones, is a gentle story about some Australian women who are standing on the precipice of change; but often feels like the entrée before the main. This […]

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Film Review: Johnny English Strikes Again (UK, 2018) with some funny and predictable hijinks

September 18, 2018

Johnny English Strikes Again is the third film in this popular franchise. This latest spy spoof follows its predecessors in once again offering audiences a funny romp with an unlikely secret agent. There are predictable scrapes and outrageous hijinks but one thing’s for certain, you are in for a fun ride. David Kerr directs this […]

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Interview: The cast of Ladies in Black describe the joy of making this true-blue Australian story

September 18, 2018

Bruce Beresford’s new film, Ladies in Black is a charming look at some department store shop girls working in Sydney in 1959. The story is adapted from a novel by the late, Madeleine St John who attended university with Clive James and the famous director. The film was a labour of love that was some […]

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Book Review: Helen Pitt’s The House is an exhilarating look at the Opera House’s colourful & dramatic history

September 18, 2018

“Our house is a very, very, very fine house.” Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young might have been singing about the suburbs, but the same can be said about the Sydney Opera House. A building beloved by Sydneysiders and tourists alike, many people may not realise the project was a doomed one. It was almost thwarted […]

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Theatre Review: The Wharf Revue’s Deja Revue celebrates politics repeating with some all-singing & all-dancing comic revelry

September 16, 2018

The Wharf Revue have been proudly entertaining audiences by skewering politicians since 2000. This year’s instalment was the troupe’s first without co-founder and musical director, Phil Scott, but the show remained strong and funny. The opening night at Parramatta’s Riverside Theatre was a rollicking one with a vaudeville feel that hit some really high notes. […]

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Book Review: I’m With the Band is like going to bed with your favourite rock star

September 10, 2018

Did you know Pamela Des Barres inspired the Penny Lane character in Almost Famous? Rock’s original groupie, Des Barres released her first-kiss-and-tell memoir I’m With the Band back in 1987. Earlier this year the book was re-released with additional chapters, and a new introduction by music journalist Roisin O’Connor. The result is one warm and rollicking read, […]

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DVD Review: Agatha Christie’s Crooked House (UK, 2018) is a mysterious trip down the garden path with a family of eccentrics

September 7, 2018

We all know the story where the butler did it. But Agatha Christie’s Crooked House isn’t like that. Published in 1949, the novel was one of the author’s favourite stories. This is also a beautifully-shot period film. It’s an adaptation that leads you down the garden path and around the maze of an eccentric family’s […]

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Film Review: The Insult (Lebanon, 2017) shows how a modern squabble can escalate due to ancient enemies

August 28, 2018

Ziad Doueiri’s Oscar nominated film, The Insult (L’insulte) could be called Pride & Prejudice. This isn’t because this Lebanese drama has anything to do with Jane Austen. Rather, it is because this film is all about how one minor conflict between two men escalates because of a combination of hubris and hatred. It seems that […]

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Film Review: Book Club (USA, 2018) is 50 Shades of Disappointment

August 23, 2018

You can imagine the meeting. “We need a film for the grey-dollar à la Best Exotic Marigold Hotel.” “How about a story involving a book club? Older women like those.” “Sure, but let’s make it into a rom-com.” “We need to include sex because that sells.” “But they might be a bit old for Sex […]

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Five things we learned about Breath from its Blu-Ray Release

August 22, 2018

The coming-of-age story, Breath is based on the acclaimed, Tim Winton novel of the same name. It is about two adolescent boys named Pikelet and Loonie who learn to surf thanks to a chance meeting with a former professional named Sando (Simon Baker). The film has just been released on Blu-ray and features several hours […]

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DVD Review: Why Australia needs more shows like Mystery Road

August 22, 2018

The secret’s out about the excellent drama/thriller series, Mystery Road. It’s actually a gripping, Australian detective story that sees the character, Jay Swan reprised from Ivan Sen’s films, Mystery Road and Goldstone. This time around the crime takes place in the small outback town of Patterson where the locals are elusive and tight-lipped about what […]

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